Mosquito Lagoon Redfish and Seatrout

Mosquito Lagoon Redfish and Seatrout

mosquito lagoon redfish

It says Mosquito Lagoon Redfish and Seatrout but we might actually be fishing in the Indian River Lagoon if the fishing has been better there. These lagoons are connected, shallow, fertile, and loaded with both redfish and seatrout. We fish for them from a skiff.

Redfish-

these fish average between four and eight pounds. There are mature, adult fish in the lagoons that go over 30 pounds and these are available sometimes, although targeting them effectively requires almost perfect weather.

We might be fishing for singles, or working on a large school. These are resident fish, available all year.

Typically we want to sight fish for redfish with fly or light tackle. Since the water has gotten dirty, blind casting may be required.

Fly fishing- rods between six- and nine-weights are appropriate. Floating lines are used exclusively. Flies should be lightly weighted and unweighted imitations of crabs, shrimp, and/or small fish, tied on #4 and #2 hooks. Weedguards are essential due to the thick grass that grows here.

Light Tackle fishing- We use light spinning tackle, seven foot rods with Shimano 3000 and 4000 series reels loaded with 15 pound braid. I prefer using single hook artificial lures, including the DOA Shrimp, the DOA Bait Buster, the DOA CAL jerk baits and shad, Johnson Minnows, and other similar lures. When necessary we will use natural baits like mullet or shrimp.

warmus big redfish

A frequently asked question is “When is the redfishing best?” How do you define best? These fish are residents. They live in the lagoons their entire lives. Because the water is usually lower and clearer in the winter, sight fishing is usually better then. Because the big fish school up and spawn at the end of the summer, big fish fishing is usually better then.

These fish are heavily fished, so they are not easy to catch. Keep your expectations realistic.

mosquito lagoon seatrout

Seatrout-

These fish average between 12 and 20 inches, but we get several fish over 25 inches every year. Like the redfish, these are resident fish and are available all year long. Sight fishing for seatrout is possible during the winter months. At other times trout fishing is largely a blind casting affair.

Typically we want to sight fish for seatrout with fly or light tackle. Since the water has gotten dirty we are often forced to blind cast.

Fly fishing- rods between six- and nine-weights are appropriate. Floating lines are used exclusively. Flies should be mostly unweighted imitations of  shrimp, and/or small fish, tied on hooks between #4 and #1/0. Weedguards are essential due to the thick grass that grows here. Poppers and gurglers sometimes work very well.

Light Tackle fishing- We use light spinning tackle, seven foot rods with Shimano 3000 and 4000 series reels loaded with 15 pound braid. I prefer using single hook artificial lures, including the DOA Shrimp, the DOA Bait Buster, the DOA CAL jerk baits and shad, and similar lures. Surface lures sometimes work very well. My own favorite is the Chug Bug. When necessary we will use natural baits like mullet or shrimp.

Summer Seatrout in Mosquito Lagoon

For more information about Mosquito Lagoon Redfish and Seatrout give us a call at 407.977.5207.