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The First Annual Spotted Tail Christmas Giving Guide

The First Annual Spotted Tail Christmas Giving Guide

 

My idea of Christmas shopping is googling what I want and then paying for it with a credit card or paypal.  So The First Annual Spotted Tail Christmas Giving Guide will have lots of links.

A fishing trip with Capt. John Kumiski makes a spectacular gift, and yes, we supply gift certificates. Or you may prefer a gift certificate to one of our popular fishing seminars.

For the well-read fisherman, books by Capt. John Kumiski are a thoughtful gift that will keep on giving. They are on sale until Christmas, too. I will even sign them!

For the fisherman with a camera, a lens cleaning kit is very useful. For dSLRs a sensor cleaning kit will make all those ugly spots go away.

For the fisherman without a camera, the Nikon AW-100 is waterproof to 30 feet and makes excellent images for a point-and-shoot. It also has video capabilities.

What paddling fisherman couldn’t use a nicer paddle? Bending Branches makes some of the nicest paddles around.

If the fisherman on your list likes to eat fish, he may have to clean one once in a while. A nice filet knife and the best way to keep it sharp will be useful for a long time. A Kevlar glove makes fish cleaning chores much safer.

Going to a tackle store and buying a bunch of stuff for your fisherman is not a good idea. Going into his tackle box, writing down the names of several items he has in there, and buying some of those on-line is an excellent idea.

Accessories make the fisherman. All fisherman need pliers, nippers, and clamps. Dr. Slick makes the nicest ones available.

A dehooker is an always-useful tool for the fisherman, too.

Any outdoorsman needs a way to carry water. The Vapur flexible one-liter Element bottle folds up once empty.

Christmas happens during the winter. Your fisherman might need to stay warm and dry. Raingear from Simms is always in excellent taste. They make a complete line of clothing for the fisherman, too, not just rainwear.

Glacier Gloves, made from neoprene, keep the hands going even when it’s cold and wet.

Many outdoorsmen find coffee an indispensible part of their morning. Stanley’s vacuum bottle carries the goods better than anything else.

Outdoorsmen also need sun protection.

The Tilley Hat is the finest headgear I have ever used and it looks good besides.

The Buff is all the rage with flats fishers nowadays, with good reason. Who needs skin cancer?

And for those skin areas not under cover of the Tilley or the Buff, Smartshield sunblock is my favorite- non-greasy, non-pasty, and extremely effective.

So with a wide range of prices, every outdoorsman on your list will find something useful in the First Annual Spotted Tail Christmas Giving Guide.

Have the merriest of Christmases!

John Kumiski
www.spottedtail.com

All content in this blog, including writing and photos, copyright John Kumiski 2013. All rights are reserved.



Thirteen Tips for Better Fishing Photography

Thirteen Tips for Better Fishing Photography

The question frequently comes at me, “What kind of camera do you use?” Here’s the answer, and some Thirteen Tips for Better Fishing Photography.

I carry two Canon Rebel XTi bodies (no longer made). One is fixed with a wide angle Tokina 10-17 mm zoom lens, an awesome piece of equipment. The other carries a telephoto Canon 70-300 mm zoom lens, likewise simply awesome. I also carry a Canon 18-55 mm lens in my camera bag.

My camera bag is a Simms Dry Creek backpack. It’s lined with pieces of an Ensolite sleeping pad cut to fit the pack. The cameras and lenses are wrapped in towels for protection. While walking or wade fishing the cameras can stay dry on my back, quickly available if an opportunity comes up.

Here come the tips. Once you understand what’s happening inside those little black boxes feel free to break these rules.

1a. Set the ISO on the wide angle lens body to 100, and don’t shoot at a shutter speed less than 1/60th of a second.

1b. Set the ISO on the telephoto lens body at 400, and don’t shoot slower than 1/300th second.

2. Keep the lenses and the camera sensors clean. A blower brush, a package of lens tissue, and a small bottle of lens cleaner are the minimum maintenance requirements.

3. Fill the frame with the subject.

Rick’s interesting face certainly fills the frame.

4. Pay attention to the light- direction and quality. Fish and many other things photograph best when the sun is low in the sky.

A late afternoon sun illuminated this scene.

5. Take pictures of people fishing, not just grip and grins. Don’t forget release shots.

The caster provides a focal point in this moody scene.

6. Take close-ups of tackle and lures, not just people.

This close up of mouse flies shows their details.

7. Take close-ups of caught fish. Don’t ignore parts that don’t have eyes.

8. Focus on eyes of whatever it is you’re photographing if they’re in the frame. See the chum salmon, above.

9. Take LOTS of pictures when you get a good opportunity. Often one of 20 or 30 is clearly the best.

10. When taking grip and grins, have the gripper howl (or some other stupid thing). Sometimes the howling makes the photo. Sometimes the laughter that follows does.

After I had him howl Andrew cracked up laughing. That’s when I got the shot.

11. Delete any photos that aren’t good. No one wants to go through 95 crappy shots to see the five good ones.

12. Fish can’t breathe when they’re not in the water. If you intend to release the fish do not beat it up!

13. Subjects wearing red or yellow will photograph better than any other color.

If you have other tips not mentioned here (and there are plenty), please feel free to share them with us!

John Kumiski
http://www.spottedtail.com

All content in this blog, including writing and photos, copyright John Kumiski 2011. All rights are reserved.




Thirteen Lucky Tips for Improving Your Fishing Photography

Thirteen Lucky Tips for Improving Your Fishing Photography

The question frequently comes at me, especially while giving slide shows, “What kind of camera do you use?” These Thirteen Lucky Tips for Improving Your Fishing Photography¬†answers the question, and gives some tips on how to use the stuff besides.

I carry two Canon Rebel XTi bodies. One is fixed with a wide angle Canon 10-22 mm zoom lens, an awesome piece of equipment, used for things I can get close to.

orlando fishing trip

The wide angle lens adds a new twist to the grip and grin!

The other carries a telephoto Canon 70-300 mm zoom lens, likewise simply awesome. Use this for things that are farther away.

orlando fishing guide

The telephoto works well for wildlife…

…and also works well for informal portraits.

I also carry a Canon 18-55 mm zoom lens in my camera bag, mostly for close-up work.

My camera bag is a Simms Dry Creek backpack. It’s lined with pieces of an Ensolite sleeping pad cut to fit the pack. The cameras and lenses are wrapped in towels for protection. While walking or wade fishing the cameras can stay dry on my back, quickly available if an opportunity comes up. I’ve done this for four years now and the pack gives plenty of protection.

Here come the tips. Once you understand what’s happening inside those little black boxes feel free to break these rules.

1a. Set the ISO on the wide angle lens body to 100, and don’t shoot at a shutter speed less than 1/60th of a second.

1b. Set the ISO on the telephoto lens at 400, and don’t shoot slower than 1/300th second.

2. Keep the lenses and the camera sensors clean. A blower brush, a package of lens tissue, and a small bottle of lens cleaner are the minimum maintenance requirements.

3. Regardless of which lens you use, try to fill the frame with the subject.

Fill the frame with the subject. The wide angle lens was used for this shot.

4. Pay attention to the light- direction and quality. Fish and many other things photograph best when the sun is low in the sky. Human faces also photograph well when light is diffuse, such as with high overcast.

Late afternoon light gives beautiful color.

5. Take pictures of people fishing, not just grip and grins. Don’t forget release shots.

Take shots of people fishing.

Take shots of people NOT fishing.

Don’t forget release shots!

6. Take close-ups of tackle and lures, not just people.

DOA Shrimp

Get shots of tackle and lures.

7. Take close-ups of caught fish. Don’t ignore parts that don’t have eyes.

Fish picture- no eyes!

But eyes are OK, too.

8. Focus on eyes of whatever it is you’re photographing if they’re in the frame.

9. Take LOTS of pictures when you get a good opportunity. Usually, one of 20 or 30 is clearly the best.

10. When taking grip and grins, have the gripper howl (or some other stupid thing). Sometimes the howling makes the photo. Sometimes the laughter that follows does.

I told Andrew to scream. When he finished he cracked up laughing.

11. Delete any photos that aren’t good. No one wants to go through 95 crappy shots to see the five good ones.

12. Fish can’t breathe when they’re not in the water. If you intend to release the fish do not beat it up!

13. Subjects wearing red or yellow will photograph better than any other color.

If you have other tips not mentioned here (and there are plenty), please feel free to share them with us!

All content in this blog, including writing and photos, copyright John Kumiski 2010. All rights are reserved.