Orlando Area Fishing Report

IRL redfish

Orlando Area Fishing Report

Blogs This Week:

Fishing Streamsong- A Photo Essay

I expanded the Orlando area fishing report this week all the way down into Polk County. It’s not a bad drive…

Monday morning found me out on the Mosquito Lagoon with fly fisher Gerry Dizinno, from Texas. I thought it odd that when I pulled into the Haulover parking lot on a holiday there was no line at the boat ramp and plenty of parking spaces. Then the fish explained it.

It was a little breezy and there were lots of clouds, not the best fly fishing weather. But the fish I had been working were mostly gone and a search mission did not turn up many more. Ominously, I saw quite a few dead ones. We did not get a bite.

Gerry emailed, “I had a good time, especially if the guide is as hard a worker as you, regardless of fish caught! When back in Orlando, if time allows, I’ll definitely arrange another trip.” Thank you, sir, very gracious.

Tuesday son Alex and I drove to Polk County to fish in the phosphate pits at Streamsong Resort (see the blog here). Tuesday evening guide Bill Read led us to about ten bass in a couple hours, including the biggest one I have ever seen caught, boated by Alex. That’s my boy!!

fishing streamsong

Alex with his prize.

Wednesday morning we got a couple dozen fish to about five pounds. All fish but one were caught on Texas-rigged soft plastics. The accommodations are beyond outstanding. If you like big bass, a plush room in which to sleep, and outstanding cuisine, then this is a place you must visit. And Bill the Guide was first-rate, too!

fishing streamsong

Bill with a nice, chunky fish. Most of our fish came on soft plastic baits Texas-rigged.

Early Friday morning long-time friend Rodney Smith joined me for some scouting on the Indian River Lagoon. It was good to see him- I hadn’t since the paddle trip ended. We quickly got three species of fish in the shallows (redfish, seatrout, and ladyfish) on jerkbaits, and then went searching for tarpon. Sadly, we did not find any, even though we found a big school of menhaden.

IRL redfish

These fish pull harder than bass do.

The boat was on the trailer at ten o’clock.

And that is this week’s Orlando Area Fishing Report.

Life is great and I love my work!

Life is short. Go Fishing!

John Kumiski
http://www.spottedtail.com

All content in this blog, including writing and photos, copyright John Kumiski 2014. All rights are reserved.



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Fishing Streamsong- A Photo Essay

fishing streamsong

Fishing Streamsong

Fishing the phosphate pits was something I’d heard about ever since I got to Florida. This week I finally got a chance to try it.

Alex and I went to Streamsong Resort on Tuesday for some fishing and R&R. In a mastery of understatement, it’s quite the place.

We fished Tuesday evening and Wednesday morning with Bill Read, one of three guides on staff. Bill was everything you want your guide to be- knowledgeable, patient, personable, with a sense of humor. We immensely enjoyed fishing with him.

If you enjoy bass fishing and plush accommodations you need to try fishing Streamsong.

On to the photos.

fishing streamsong

Fossilized shark teeth set in jaws.

 

 

fishing streamsong

Close-up of said teeth.

 

fishing streamsong

Overlooking one of the ponds on the property.

 

fishing streamsong

View inside the main building.

 

fishing streamsong

One of the fine restaurants on-site.

 

fishing streamsong

The bookshelf in our room was custom made for these books.

 

fishing streamsong

Some of the other guests had nice wheels.

 

fishing streamsong

Bill Read on the morning run.

 

fishing streamsong

Alex slings some line.

 

fishing streamsong

The only bass that fell to fly.

 

fishing streamsong

Bill with a nice, chunky fish. Most of our fish came on soft plastic baits Texas-rigged.

 

fishing streamsong

Alex trying to finish the job.

 

fishing streamsong

This was a nice fish!

 

fishing streamsong

Alex with his prize.

 

fishing streamsong

Alex and Bill do a little celebrating.

 

I certainly hope I get another chance at fishing Streamsong!

 

John Kumiski
http://www.spottedtail.com

All content in this blog, including writing and photos, copyright John Kumiski 2014. All rights are reserved.



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Casting for Recovery and Tycoon Tackle, Inc. join forces to support women with breast cancer

Casting for Recovery and Tycoon Tackle, Inc. join forces to support women with breast cancer

The fly rod manufacturer donates a portion of its custom fly rod sales to the national fly fishing program for women with breast cancer

Manchester, VT— Casting for Recovery, a non-profit organization offering support and educational fly fishing retreats for women with breast cancer is excited to partner with fishing outfitter and rod manufacturer Tycoon Tackle, Inc. in Charlottesville, Virginia. Tycoon Tackle has committed to building an unlimited quantity of custom co-branded rods named “The Martha Ann” in honor of Tycoon Tackle president Tim O’Brien’s mother, Martha Ann O’Brien, who lost her battle to breast cancer in 2007. $100 of every sale of “The Martha Ann” rods directly support Casting for Recovery’s renowned programs for women with breast cancer.

Courtesy of O'Brien family

Martha Ann O’Brien spent more than 30 years of her life in and around Tycoon Tackle, as an employee and wife to the company’s founder. Although Martha Ann was not an avid angler, she was known to “mix it up” with the fish from time to time.  Her spirit and wit would bring the most intense angler to laughter.  One time after landing a 56-pound Amberjack on a light-spinning rod she quipped, “Is that all there is to that?”

“My mother waged a gallant battle with breast cancer, one that she ultimately lost, but not without a fight with vigor, humor, and gusto,” says Tim O’Brien, president of Tycoon Tackle. “Through the custom fishing rod named after her, her spirit will live on in the streams, rivers, lakes, and flats of the world. We believe in Casting for Recovery’s mission of providing life-changing programs that combine the therapeutic sport of fly fishing with counseling and medical education for women in any stage of breast cancer treatment and recovery.”

“We are excited to partner with one of the longest-standing custom rod makers in the industry,” says CfR executive director, Whitney Milhoan. “We are honored to be the recipient of proceeds of “The Martha Ann” rod since it’s so close to the hearts of the family at Tycoon Tackle. Nearly everyone has been touched by breast cancer, and it’s inspiring to see Tycoon Tackle’s passion to support other women who have been affected by this devastating disease.”

The Martha Ann rod will be available for order in mid May at www.tycoonoutfitters.com. It will be a custom, built-to-order, co-branded rod in weights from three to five. Each rod will be shipped in a custom rod sock and co-branded aluminum rod tube for $499.95 plus shipping and handling.  $100 of every sale goes to Casting for Recovery.  More details will be forthcoming.

To learn more about Casting for Recovery, or how to help, please visit http://castingforrecovery.orgor contact Holly Calloway at Holly.Calloway@castingforrecovery.org.

Casting for Recovery® (CfR) is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit founded in 1996 by two women — a breast reconstructive surgeon and a professional fly fisher.  CfR’s unique program combines breast cancer education and peer support with the therapeutic sport of fly fishing. The retreats offer opportunities for women to find inspiration, discover renewed energy for life and experience healing connections with other women and nature. CfR’s retreats are open to breast cancer survivors of all ages, in all stages of treatment and recovery, and are free to participants.  

CastingforRecovery.org

www.facebook.com/castingforrecovery

About Tycoon Tackle, Inc.

Tycoon Tackle, Inc. is a Charlottesville, Virginia-based angling outfitter that originated in Miami, Florida in 1935.  The company was on the scene in the formative years of big-game angling and at one time more than 95% of all world record fish were caught on the company’s fishing rods. Tim O’Brien, owner and President the company, said, “The company began with little money but ‘a fortune in ideas’ and in time grew to become a leader in the angling world, by not only making the best and most desirable fishing rods but by being a leader in promoting the catch and release of gamefish” The company is still family owned and committed to manufacturing products in the United States of America.

http://tycoonoutfitters.com

https://www.facebook.com/tycoonoutfitters

 

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how to get through a day of fishing without hurting your back

how to get through a day of fishing without hurting your back

guest blog by Peter Miller

Fishing is commonly thought of as the ultimate stress reliever, but it can also lead to back pain or serious back injuries if proper measurements aren’t followed. In fact, according to a Duke University Medical Center study, 69 percent of fishermen suffer from back pain at some point during their fishing career. Heavy lifting, repetitive motions, and long days of standing with the body in the same position often causes stress, tension and muscle fatigue in the back and makes fishermen susceptible to a number of debilitating back injuries.

One fishing enthusiast all too familiar with how fishing can cause back pain is professional angler Peter Miller. Following an injury that herniated two discs and pinched a nerve in his lower back, the three time World Sailfish Champion and host of NBC show “Bass 2 Billfish with Peter Miller” suffered chronic pain that prevented him from fishing at the top of his game. After deciding to have surgery with Tampa-based Laser Spine Institute, the leader in minimally invasive spine surgery, Peter was able to return to doing what he loves and has since worked closely with his surgeon, Dr. Stefan Prada, M. D., to develop a list of tips for how to prevent back pain during a day of fishing:

Get really comfortable shoes. Traditionally, fishermen wear flip flops, boat shoes or bare feet. These shoes offer little support and have no cushion to absorb shock. Try wearing shoes that are more traditional for jogging than for fishing.

Stretch. Even 5 minutes worth of stretching before you get on the boat or mid-day can make a tremendous difference. Try touching your toes or the floor and reaching your hands over your head to stretch your back.

Maintain a strong core. A strong core will make you better prepared for the various motions involved when fishing, such as throwing a cast and reeling in a fish. Planks, push-ups, v-sits and leg lifts are all great exercises to develop a strong core.

Take Advil. Anti-inflammatory medications in mild doses will always help. Try taking some anti-inflammatory medications prior to taking the boat out to help prevent inflammation during the day.

Stay active. Don’t be sedentary. The kiss of death is sitting all day on a boat. One great way to help your back muscles stay active, warm and loose while on the boat is the cat-and-dog exercise: position yourself on your hand and knees and alternate between rounding your back by looking down on the ground and arching it by looking up into the sky.

Stay hydrated. Drinking enough water is essential to helping reduce pain. It helps keep the muscles hydrated and helps avoid muscle cramps.

And that’s how to get through a day of fishing without hurting your back.

John Kumiski
www.spottedtail.com



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New Mobile Marine Service Central Florida

New Mobile Marine Service Central Florida

There is a fantastic new mobile marine service in central Florida.

Started last fall, Orlando Mobile Marine is the baby of Mr. Fernando Fonseca, who brings over 20 years of experience in marine services to his new business. Fernando is a certified master technician for Johnson/Evinrude and Yamaha. He also services Mercury, Honda, and Suzuki outboards as well as Yamaha Wave Runners and other brands of personal watercraft.

He also performs boat repairs- custom lighting and rigging, electrical work, mechanical work, and detailing.

Fernando says, “Reliability and attention to detail are very important to my customers and to me. Customers are welcome to watch me to see what I’m doing as I work on their boat. It helps them understand the workings of their vessel better.”

Fernando says his rates are comparable or less than those found at other marine service centers in central Florida.

Fernando just rigged a new 70 horsepower Yamaha four stroke engine on my friend Karl Dienst’s venerable Hewes Bonefisher, replacing the old 90 hp that had powered the boat for the last 18 years. Karl was thrilled with the work Fernando did. “Fernando did a great job. I was impressed with his ability to work quickly, neatly, and with precision, without overcharging. He did not try to sell me other services or parts that I didn’t need or want. I am very, very happy with the work, and the boat runs like a scalded dog now.”

Mind you, this is a mobile marine service. That means he brings the shop to you. For this service there is a one-time fee of $60 per job. If he has to come out two or three times to get the job finished, you only pay the service fee once. Of course, parts and labor are additional, but compare favorably with any other shop in central Florida. And you get the benefit of Fernando’s extensive experience and attention to detail.

Orlando Mobile Marine, the fantastic new mobile marine service in central Florida. When your boat needs work, visit their website or give them a call at 407.232.4749.

John Kumiski
http://www.spottedtail.com

All content in this blog, including writing and photos, copyright John Kumiski 2014. All rights are reserved.



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Banana River Lagoon Fishing Report

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Banana River Lagoon Fishing Report 22214

Upcoming Events-
-Mosquito Lagoon Show and Tell Fishing Seminar, March 15. Visit this link  for more information or to register…
-Mosquito Lagoon On-the-Water Show and Tell Fishing Seminar, March 16. Visit this link  for more information or to register…

Blog Posts this Week-
- Sharkwave Fly Lines Coming
- Lunkerhunt Swim Bentos Bait
- Oil Drilling Coming to the Everglades

The new issue (March 2014) of Florida Sportsman has an article about the Indian River Lagoon Odyssey, by John Kumiski! Check it out!

On to the fishing, men!

Monday the weather was gorgeous, so I strapped the kayak to the roof of the chariot and drove over to the Banana River Lagoon. I got there after nine o’clock. Six cars were already there. I avoided the other boats as much as I could.

Travelling along the shoreline I saw two small trout, two small redfish, and then a school of about 20 small reds, less than 20 inch fish. They elicited no response in me.

I went out to the second bar. There was nothing there.

I went to the third bar. Two boats were there, one on each side. I went up the middle. The water was clear, there was hardly any grass, and I saw nothing. I kept going.

On the fourth bar there was a school of black drum, not the big ones. Two tasted my black bunny leech. The larger one was 12 pounds or so.

I left them, hoping to find big fish. A group of eight big reds was swimming high in the water. I got two casts at them but they ignored me.

The paddle back was uneventful, as no fish were seen.

The grass up there is all gone, and so are most of the fish. It’s a sad thing.

Tuesday found me on a bus travelling to Tallahassee for the Clean Water Rally. Senator David Simmons, the senator from my district, was one of the speakers. Good work, sir!

I had a meeting with my district’s representative, Rep. Jason Brodeur. He told me he understands the need for clean water, would be sponsored a bill addressing clean water issues. It was good to hear, but show me the money. Stay tuned.

One of the speakers was a woman from Naples, Dr. Karen Dwyer, of the Stone Crab Alliance. Here is what she had to say: ” The Everglades oil rush is on. In addition to the 115,000 acres leased for oil exploration, Collier Resources just issued two more leases for massive seismic testing operations to identify more locations for oil drilling: 103,000 acres to Tocala, LLC and 234,500 acres to Burnett Oil, all in the Big Cypress National Preserve in the western Everglades. Everyone. March 11. Please. Pack the EPA Meeting. Take a stand for the Everglades and our water. Now is the time. No one can take your place.”

Fight for your right to clean water!

Fight for your right to clean water!

How this has escaped the state and national news media is beyond me. All fishermen should be going crazy over this- hydraulic fracturing in the Everglades? WE CAN’T LET THIS HAPPEN!!! I will be in Naples on March 11. I hope to see you there.

Wednesday Rick DePaiva, one of my dearest friends, came up to fish with me. Because he likes going there and because I got a good report from one of my subscribers we went to KARS Park and launched the canoe.

The weather was awesome.

The short version is that we went most of the way to the NASA Causeway, went out to the islands on the other side of the channel, and worked it hard. We saw maybe eight fish and had one half-baked shot that did not work. So we went fishless. Had a good time other than that, enjoying the day and Rick’s company.

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 This is what we wanted. It is not what we got.

            Again, most of the grass is gone. This area had such thick grass just a couple years ago, too. Bad, bad, bad Bad BAD.

And that is this week’s not so great Banana River Lagoon Fishing Report.

Life is great and I love my work!

Life is short. Go Fishing!

John Kumiski
http://www.spottedtail.com

All content in this blog, including writing and photos, copyright John Kumiski 2014. All rights are reserved.




Sharkwave Fly Lines Coming

Sharkwave Fly Lines Coming

Whether you hated or loved the Sharkskin line, here comes an entire family of them. The latest press release from Scientific Anglers-

The Development of the SharkWave
When we introduced the Sharkskin™ family of lines in 2007, they weren’t simply the latest in a long line of high-quality innovations. The Sharkskin created an entirely new category of product: textured fly lines. These lines, developed and manufactured at the Scientific Anglers facility in Midland, Michigan, represented one of the most interesting and groundbreaking evolutions in the history of fly line technology.

The benefits of the textured lines were numerous: increased surface area allowed the lines to sit higher in the water, offering less drag, easier mending, less water spray, and easier pick-ups; the micro-textured surface trapped air to provide increases in both shootability and flotation—all while decreasing friction; and the microreplicated pattern increased the durability of the lines, allowing them to last up to twice as long.

The accolades mounted. But we knew we could do better.

Using what we learned while developing the Sharkskin, we developed the Mastery Textured series. These lines took the high points of the Sharkskin technology and combined them with the easy feel of traditional, smooth fly lines, resulting in a textured line that performs like the Sharkskin, but feels smoother to the touch.

Then something struck us: Let’s take the best parts of the Sharkskin, combine it with the Mastery Textured series, and see what happens.

The result? Meet the SharkWave, the world’s first Triple-Textured and Triple-Colored fly line. Featuring Sharkskin texture on the tip section, Mastery Textured divots for the belly and running line, a smooth Tactile Reference Point at the AFTMA 30-foot mark, SA•ID line identification, AST dry slick technology, Improved Dry Tip technology, and Streamlined Loops, the SharkWave is unlike any fly line we’ve ever produced.

It’s fishing. Friction-free.

It won’t be cheap. I hope they include finger guards in the box.

See the entire press release with photos, graphs, and illustrations here…

John Kumiski
http://www.spottedtail.com

All content in this blog, including writing and photos, copyright John Kumiski 2014. All rights are reserved.

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Oil Drilling Coming to the Everglades

Fight for your right to clean water!

Oil Drilling Coming to the Everglades?

Is oil drilling coming to the Everglades?1798497_10203291943840558_357090852_n

This request came from Dr. Karen Dwyer in Naples, Florida:

“Join us, March 11, in Naples and bring as many people as you can. This is an URGENT REQUEST. The federal EPA is flying in for a hearing that could decide the fate of Florida water and open the door to Everglades drilling. We need to act fast and get big. It’s time to show just how strong and far reaching opposition is to Everglades drilling. We need you at the hearing to say “NO” to the injection well. March 11. Clean water not dirty drilling. See you in Naples!”

If you fish or bird watch in Everglades National Park, if you don’t want the door swung wide open to oil drilling in or off the beaches of Florida, you need to sport these folks any way you can. For more information visit this link

Help stop oil drilling coming to the Everglades!

John Kumiski



 

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Demand Clean Water Now

demand clean water

Demand Clean Water Now

Most of my readers are fishermen. For obvious reasons they need clean water. But all humans and most other organisms require clean water. Since our elected and appointed officials are in many cases taking liberties with that vital resource, it’s time all responsible citizens demand clean water now.

demand clean water

Should Florida’s citizens have to put up with this? Is it a sewer or a river?

On December 1 the Indian River Lagoon Paddle Adventure kicked off. One of the reasons we made this paddle voyage is to highlight the plight of the most biologically diverse estuary in North America. What plight, you ask? Algae blooms have badly fouled lagoon waters the past two summers, caused by nutrient overload in the north half of the lagoon. Nutrient-laden fresh water discharges from Lake Okeechobee have wreaked havoc on the south half of the lagoon for years.

No Drinking Water

Coming soon to a faucet near you?

It’s got to stop.

There are similar problems going on in water bodies state-wide. Coral reefs in the Keys are dying. What happened to the bonefish??? Springs are losing flow. The Floridan Aquifer is becoming polluted. Click on this link to see the hot spots in your community (and there probably are some). Click this link to see photos of the nasty stuff. Is your favorite fishing hole here yet?

If we don’t take action the quality of life we so often take for granted will continue to spiral downward.

The Indian River Lagoon has gotten bad press for the past two years. “Toxic algae blooms”, “fish kills”, “dead dolphins and manatees”, “loss of seagrass”, “a dying lagoon.” It’s affected the economy of the region. Tourists don’t want to visit or go fishing on a dying lagoon.

No one needs to re-invent the wheel. There already exists a core of clean water activists. Help them by offering support in any way you can. You can volunteer at this link…

One easy way to offer support is by signing the Floridian’s Clean Water Declaration.

FLORIDIANS’ CLEAN WATER DECLARATION

In recognition that:

Clean water is essential for healthy people and a healthy economy. Florida water quality and quantity are inseparably linked.

Florida waters are held in public trust by the State of Florida for the benefit of its people and the maintenance of natural ecosystems.

We the undersigned hereby declare:

The people of Florida have an inalienable right to:

  1. Clean drinking water whether that water is drawn from public sources or private wells.
  2. Safe lakes, streams, springs, rivers, canals and coastal waters for swimming and fishing.
  3. Protection from water pollution and its effects.
  4. Know the sources of pollution that threaten Florida’s waters.
  5. Protection from water privatization and its effects.
  6. Abundant water for drinking, fishing and recreation.

The people of Florida, the state government, and the industries that benefit from Florida’s natural resources have the responsibility to:

  1. Stop pollution at its source rather than allowing it to enter our waters.
  2. Protect Florida’s waters, as well as the people who depend on them, fromoverconsumption and privatization.
  3. Protect the natural environment which is critical to the health of Florida’s people,wildlife and economy.
  4. Provide clean water for future generations.

By signing this declaration, we agree to its principles and resolve to work together in good faith to ensure that the future of our waters will be driven by the concepts contained within this FLORIDIANS’ CLEAN WATER DECLARATION.

If you agree with this statement and want to sign on, please visit this link NOW…

It only makes sense that we all demand clean water now.

John Kumiski
http://www.spottedtail.com

All content in this blog, including writing and photos, copyright John Kumiski 2013. All rights are reserved.



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Indian River Lagoon and Mosquito Lagoon Fishing Report

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Indian River Lagoon and Mosquito Lagoon Fishing Report

Upcoming Events-

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The Indian River Lagoon Paddle Adventure kicks off on November 30. Paddle a section or the length of the lagoon with us! Now, if you don’t know about the IRL Paddle Adventure, a bunch of us are paddling from New Smyrna to Jupiter, 160 miles, to raise awareness and money for the Indian River Lagoon. Readers can help by sponsoring us, following our progress, and publicizing the event (facebook, twitter, whatever). Thank you for your support!

Blog Posts this Week:

-Fly Fish Banana River Black Drum

-Deadly Flats Fishing Mistakes

-Getting Out of Dodge, with El Chico

 

OK, what else? Ah yes, last Saturday I attended the Florida Citizens Clean Water Summit held at UCF. The water crisis in Florida is not just algae blooms in the Indian River Lagoon. It includes low spring flows, polluted aquifers, agricultural discharges, and more. Our politicians have let us down. Oh yeah, that’s what they do. So what are we going to do about it? We’re going to hold rallies. We’re going to march on Tallahassee. We’re going to demand our right to clean water for swimming, fishing, drinking, etc. Get informed. Get involved. Clean water is vitally important to all of us.

So, did we fish this week???

Monday found me on Mosquito Lagoon with the Reverend Larry Kirk and Dalen Mills. I hadn’t seen Larry in a long time and as always we had thought-provoking conversation about light topics, like the existence of God and the likelihood of Immaculate Conception. When it came to finding fish God was not with us, though. We looked from the Pole/Troll area down into Max Hoeck Creek and saw perhaps a half dozen reds all day, with pretty decent weather (at least for lately) too. One 12 inch trout was all that separated us from the skunk.

Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday it blew like snot with overcast and spitting rain. The Spotted Tail stayed home.

Friday, going crazy from staying inside, I put the kayak on the van and drove to the Indian River Lagoon in spite of wind, clouds, spitting rain, and a water level gauge at 1.4. So when the water was high and dirty and I couldn’t see anything I was not surprised.

I ran over two nice redfish and saw one tail briefly, did not get a shot. I blind-cast fruitlessly for 30 minutes or so. I was glad to be away from the computer.

On the way back I stopped at Kayaks by Bo to see Tom and Lynn. Great folks, great shop. Check ‘em out.

With Thanksgiving this week and the Paddle Adventure starting on Saturday I will only be getting out fishing one day this week. The chance of a fishing report next weekend is small. I hope to blog and report while on the paddle adventure though, although the schedule will be different than every weekend.

Argonaut Publishing Company is having a big Christmas Sale on all of its fishing books by one Capt. John Kumiski. Visit this link to do some holiday shopping!

That is this week’s exciting version of the Indian River Lagoon and Mosquito Lagoon Fishing Report.

Life is great and I love my work!

Life is short. Go Fishing!

John Kumiski
http://www.spottedtail.com

All content in this blog, including writing and photos, copyright John Kumiski 2013. All rights are reserved.